Confirmed – British Rescued Martin Bormann

henrymakow.com — June 27, 2014

Journalist Milton Shulman advised John Ainsworth Davis on the book "Op JB." He left a 70-page account of this collaboration in his autobiography, Marilyn, Hitler & Me, published in 1998. Click to enlarge

Journalist Milton Shulman advised John Ainsworth Davis on the book “Op JB.” He left a 70-page account of this collaboration in his autobiography, Marilyn, Hitler & Me, published in 1998. Click to enlarge

Before “James Bond” became a household word, it was the name of the operation that rescued Martin Bormann from Berlin, May 2, 1945. The mission was led by Ian Fleming and John Ainsworth Davis, who inspired Fleming’s novels. Ainsworth Davis chronicled this mission in his book “Op JB” (1996) written under the pseudonym Christopher Creighton. Its authenticity is supported by Milton Shulman’s account of their seven-year collaboration.
Read this First: Proof World War Two was a Charade
“The idea that Churchill should authorize such a preposterous operation simply beggars belief. I cannot believe Churchill would have risked alienating our allies by secretly protecting someone as senior as Bormann, while every effort was being made to apprehend other war criminals.” – Richard Overy, Professor of Modern History, King’s College, London

by Henry Makow Ph.D.

Professor Overy’s reaction was typical of the skepticism that greeted John Ainsworth-Davis’ book, “Op JB” both before and after it was published in 1996. Martin Bormann was not just a “senior” Nazi. He was second only to Hitler. He controlled the Nazi Party machine. He controlled the money. Moreover, he promoted the “Final Solution” that led to the deaths of millions of Jews.
The idea that this man could have been a British agent was more than many people could bear.
Even more puzzling, “Op JB” was released by a major establishment publisher, Simon and Schuster. How could this be?
Milton Shulman (1913-2004) was the drama critic for the London Evening Standard for 38 years. During the war, he served with military intelligence profiling the Wehrmacht Order of Battle. In 1989, after writing about his wartime experience, he received a letter from “Christopher Creighton.” This began a seven-year collaboration which finally led to the publication of “Op JB” in 1996. Shulman’s detailed 70-page account (“Martin Bormann and Nazi Gold”) in his autobiography answers many questions about this, the most controversial and revealing book of World War Two.
At least three major publishers optioned the book and reneged before Simon and Schuster bought the rights at an auction for about $250,000. In 1983, the German Daily, Stern, had paid $6 million for Hitler’s Diary, which turned out to be a hoax. The editors concerned were fired and Professor Hugh Trevor Roper, who had endorsed the Diary, was humiliated. Because of fear that Creighton was also a hoaxer, he was made to run a gauntlet of interrogations on numerous occasions by wary publishers. Shulman writes:
“Whatever Creighton described –whether it was a traveling route, a conversation… a piece of complex technical equipment like infra-red instruments…minute facts were provided to justify authenticity. In seven years of monitoring [Creighton's] accounts, I found an astonishing consistency about these myriad details, and under questioning by numerous experts, he rarely wavered.” (p. 126)
Creighton produced letters from Churchill, Ian Fleming and Lord Montbatten (all dead by then) confirming the authenticity of the operation. Montbatten sent him a Memorandum listing all the personnel that took part and confirming Creighton and Fleming “escorted Martin Bormann out of the bunker and made your escape downstream on the rivers Spree and Havel, arriving on the West Bank of the Elbe to the safety of Allied forces there on May 11th…” (p.133)
When the publishers questioned the authenticity of these letters, Creighton produced an affidavit from “Susan Kemp,” the Third in Command of the Operation, and finally she appeared before the publishers in person. “Not only had Susan Kemp been third in command in the kayaks bringing Bormann to Potsdam, but she was also Bormann’s Intelligence Control when he arrived in England and eventually she took over Morton’s position as head of M Section.” (155)
When the book finally appeared, the critical reception was “horrendous.” No one could believe that “such a childish fantasy was fact” nor understand how a reputable publisher like Simon and Schuster could issue “such a farrago of nonsense.” (160) Yet, when Creighton offered a reward of $30,000 to anyone who could debunk the story, no one tried.
In spite of the critical reaction, the book sold about a million copies worldwide, but no film was made. It seems likely that MI-6 orchestrated the campaign to discredit the book. Another book claiming Bormann had died in Berlin appeared at exactly the same time, and before that, MI-6 had produced a Bormann who was then exposed as a hoax.

WHY DID THE ILLUMINATI LET CREIGHTON PRODUCE THIS BOOK?

Read this First: Proof World War Two was a Charade “The idea that Churchill should authorize such a preposterous operation simply beggars belief. I cannot believe Churchill would have risked alienating our allies by secretly protecting someone as senior as Bormann, while every effort was being made to apprehend other war criminals.” - Richard Overy, Professor of Modern History, King’s College, London


by Henry Makow Ph.D.

Professor Overy’s reaction was typical of the skepticism that greeted John Ainsworth-Davis’ book, “Op JB” both before and after it was published in 1996.  Martin Bormann was not just a “senior” Nazi. He was second only to Hitler. He controlled the Nazi Party machine. He controlled the money. Moreover, he promoted the “Final Solution” that led to the deaths of millions of Jews.

The idea that this man could have been a British agent was more than many people could bear.

Even more puzzling, “Op JB” was released by a major establishment publisher, Simon and Schuster. How could this be?

Milton Shulman
(1913-2004) was the drama critic for the London Evening Standard for 38 years. During the war, he served with military intelligence profiling the Wehrmacht Order of Battle.  In 1989, after writing about his wartime experience, he received a letter from “Christopher Creighton.” This began a seven-year collaboration which finally led to the publication of “Op JB” in 1996. Shulman’s detailed 70-page account (“Martin Bormann and Nazi Gold”) in his autobiography answers many questions about this, the most controversial and revealing book of World War Two.

At least three major publishers optioned the book and reneged before Simon and Schuster bought the rights at an auction for about $250,000. In 1983, the German Daily, Stern, had paid $6 million for Hitler’s Diary, which turned out to be a hoax. The editors concerned were fired and Professor Hugh Trevor Roper, who had endorsed the Diary, was humiliated. Because of fear that Creighton was also a hoaxer, he was made to run a gauntlet of interrogations on numerous occasions by wary publishers. Shulman writes:

“Whatever Creighton described –whether it was a traveling route, a conversation… a piece of complex technical equipment like infra-red instruments…minute facts were provided to justify authenticity. In seven years of monitoring [Creighton's] accounts, I found an astonishing consistency about these myriad details, and under questioning by numerous experts, he rarely wavered.” (p. 126)

Creighton produced letters from Churchill, Ian Fleming and Lord Montbatten (all dead by then) confirming the authenticity of the operation. Montbatten sent him a Memorandum listing all the personnel that took part and confirming Creighton and Fleming “escorted Martin Bormann out of the bunker and made your escape downstream on the rivers Spree and Havel, arriving on the West Bank of the Elbe to the safety of Allied forces there on May 11th…” (p.133)

When the publishers questioned the authenticity of these letters, Creighton produced an affidavit from “Susan Kemp,” the Third in Command of the Operation, and finally she appeared before the publishers in person. “Not only had Susan Kemp been third in command in the kayaks bringing Bormann to Potsdam, but she was also Bormann’s Intelligence Control when he arrived in England and eventually she took over Morton’s position as head of M Section.” (155)

When the book finally appeared, the critical reception was “horrendous.” No one could believe that “such a childish fantasy was fact” nor understand how a reputable publisher like Simon and Schuster could issue “such a farrago of nonsense.” (160) Yet, when Creighton offered a reward of $30,000 to anyone who could debunk the story, no one tried.

In spite of the critical reaction, the book sold about a million copies worldwide, but no film was made. It seems likely that MI-6 orchestrated the campaign to discredit the book. Another book claiming Bormann had died in Berlin appeared at exactly the same time, and before that, MI-6 had produced a Bormann who was then exposed as a hoax.

WHY DID THE ILLUMINATI LET CREIGHTON PRODUCE THIS BOOK?

- See more at: http://henrymakow.com/2014/06/Confirmed-British-Rescued-Martin-Bormann.html#sthash.iVo4sNrT.dpuf

Read this First: Proof World War Two was a Charade “The idea that Churchill should authorize such a preposterous operation simply beggars belief. I cannot believe Churchill would have risked alienating our allies by secretly protecting someone as senior as Bormann, while every effort was being made to apprehend other war criminals.” - Richard Overy, Professor of Modern History, King’s College, London


by Henry Makow Ph.D.

Professor Overy’s reaction was typical of the skepticism that greeted John Ainsworth-Davis’ book, “Op JB” both before and after it was published in 1996.  Martin Bormann was not just a “senior” Nazi. He was second only to Hitler. He controlled the Nazi Party machine. He controlled the money. Moreover, he promoted the “Final Solution” that led to the deaths of millions of Jews.

The idea that this man could have been a British agent was more than many people could bear.

Even more puzzling, “Op JB” was released by a major establishment publisher, Simon and Schuster. How could this be?

Milton Shulman
(1913-2004) was the drama critic for the London Evening Standard for 38 years. During the war, he served with military intelligence profiling the Wehrmacht Order of Battle.  In 1989, after writing about his wartime experience, he received a letter from “Christopher Creighton.” This began a seven-year collaboration which finally led to the publication of “Op JB” in 1996. Shulman’s detailed 70-page account (“Martin Bormann and Nazi Gold”) in his autobiography answers many questions about this, the most controversial and revealing book of World War Two.

At least three major publishers optioned the book and reneged before Simon and Schuster bought the rights at an auction for about $250,000. In 1983, the German Daily, Stern, had paid $6 million for Hitler’s Diary, which turned out to be a hoax. The editors concerned were fired and Professor Hugh Trevor Roper, who had endorsed the Diary, was humiliated. Because of fear that Creighton was also a hoaxer, he was made to run a gauntlet of interrogations on numerous occasions by wary publishers. Shulman writes:

“Whatever Creighton described –whether it was a traveling route, a conversation… a piece of complex technical equipment like infra-red instruments…minute facts were provided to justify authenticity. In seven years of monitoring [Creighton's] accounts, I found an astonishing consistency about these myriad details, and under questioning by numerous experts, he rarely wavered.” (p. 126)

Creighton produced letters from Churchill, Ian Fleming and Lord Montbatten (all dead by then) confirming the authenticity of the operation. Montbatten sent him a Memorandum listing all the personnel that took part and confirming Creighton and Fleming “escorted Martin Bormann out of the bunker and made your escape downstream on the rivers Spree and Havel, arriving on the West Bank of the Elbe to the safety of Allied forces there on May 11th…” (p.133)

When the publishers questioned the authenticity of these letters, Creighton produced an affidavit from “Susan Kemp,” the Third in Command of the Operation, and finally she appeared before the publishers in person. “Not only had Susan Kemp been third in command in the kayaks bringing Bormann to Potsdam, but she was also Bormann’s Intelligence Control when he arrived in England and eventually she took over Morton’s position as head of M Section.” (155)

When the book finally appeared, the critical reception was “horrendous.” No one could believe that “such a childish fantasy was fact” nor understand how a reputable publisher like Simon and Schuster could issue “such a farrago of nonsense.” (160) Yet, when Creighton offered a reward of $30,000 to anyone who could debunk the story, no one tried.

In spite of the critical reaction, the book sold about a million copies worldwide, but no film was made. It seems likely that MI-6 orchestrated the campaign to discredit the book. Another book claiming Bormann had died in Berlin appeared at exactly the same time, and before that, MI-6 had produced a Bormann who was then exposed as a hoax.

WHY DID THE ILLUMINATI LET CREIGHTON PRODUCE THIS BOOK?

- See more at: http://henrymakow.com/2014/06/Confirmed-British-Rescued-Martin-Bormann.html#sthash.iVo4sNrT.dpuf

Continues …

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.