Michael Jackson Appears as Hologram at the Billboard Awards … And is Used for Illuminati Agenda

Vigilant Citizen — vigilantcitizen.com May 21, 2014

Michael Jackson, aka the King of Pop, tragically lost his life in strange and nebulous circumstances in June 2009. Five years later, his image is used to generate money for a record company he hated with a passion.
Almost ironically entitled Xscape, Michael Jackson’s new posthumous album was released by Epic Records, a division of Sony Music. As I noted in the article entitled When Insiders Expose the Ugly Side of the Entertainment Industry, MJ was becoming increasingly vocal out about the evils of the music industry and was especially disgusted by Sony Music. Here’s a video of a speech he gave in 2002. As you’ll see, MJ did not like Sony nor the ex-President of the company Tommy Mottola. He explains how Motolla, Mariah Carey’s ex-husband, acted more like a MK slave handler – while holding a sign saying “$ony Kills Music”.

Fast-forward to today. Sony owns MJ’s image and uses a hologram of MJ to make him sing and dance. Years after his death, MJ truly cannot “Xscape” exploitation by the music industry.
MJ hologram performed at the 2014 Billboard awards the song Slave to Rythm, a title that sadly captures MJ’s fate with the music business. Even worse, the set is full of the symbolism of the occult elite he tried to escape from.
Here’s the “performance”.

The “performance” begins with a group of policemen dressed in riot gear. Complete with oppressive helicopters and spotlights, the intro is yet another example music business turning the concept of an oppressive police state into something normal and fashionable. It also tells us that this MJ “performance” was brought to you by the occult elite.

MJ is introduced by a bunch of police dressed in riot gear – a continuation of the police state agenda that prevails across the music business.

Continues …

From films, architecture and music, Vigilant Citizen exposes and explains the hidden occult symbolism behind much of modern culture

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