Diego Garcia Theft Epitomizes Government Evil

In 2002 the natives sued the UK government and won, but the Masonic court system awarded them no compensation.

In 1970, 2000 islanders were forcibly deported to make way for a US air force base. Although the base is worth billions, the natives didn’t get a cent for their homes, possessions and way of life. They live in destitution in Mauritius and the Seychelles. They weren’t even opposed to the base. All they wanted was jobs working there. Instead the US imported 3000 Filipinos. Talk about bloody-minded.

Diego Garcia Theft Epitomizes Government Evil

by Sherwood Ross — Islanders Forcibly Deported (Abridged by henrymakow.com) April 8, 2014

In order to convert the sleepy, Indian Ocean island of Diego Garcia into a dominating military base, the U.S. forcibly transported its 2,000 Chagossian inhabitants into exile and gassed their dogs. [The were allowed to take their clothes- nothing else.]
By banning journalists from the area, the U.S. Navy was able to perpetrate this with virtually no press coverage, says David Vine, an assistant professor of anthropology at American University and author of “Island of Shame: the Secret History of the U.S. Military on Diego Garcia” (Princeton University Press).
“The Chagossians were put on a boat and taken to Mauritius and the Seychelles, 1,200 miles away, where they were left on the docks, with no money and no housing, to fend for themselves,” Vine said on the interview show “Books Of Our Time,” sponsored by the Massachusetts School of Law at Andover.
“They were promised jobs that never materialized. They had been living on an island with schools, hospitals, and full employment, sort of like a French coastal village, and they were consigned to a life of abject poverty in exile, unemployment, health problems, and were the poorest of the poor,” Vine told interview host Lawrence Velvel, dean of the law school.
Their pet dogs were rounded up and gassed, and their bodies burned, before the very eyes of their traumatized owners, Vine said.

Continues …

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