Have You Read the Talmud Lately?

By Rev. Ted Pike – Truthtellers.org

In my last e-alert, I was the bearer of bad news: Deep within Judaism’s most sacred rabbinic writings, the Talmud and Zohar (Kabbalah), there exists the obligation to overthrow existing Gentile and Christian society and establish a “new Jewish order.” Such Judaic teaching powerfully diminishes the value of Gentile lives, particularly today in Israel’s occupied territories and Lebanon.

 I was consequently vilified by a number of readers. One asked, “Where do you get this trash?” He said that if he needed to know the dark side of Judaism, he’d rather do it from Mein Kampf!

 The truth is that, with the possible exception of some secular Jewish congregations, every synagogue in the world contains the Talmud and Zohar. It’s from these works that my assertions came. They are the two most important sources of inspired literature for observant Jews, greatly surpassing the Bible. The Talmud however, is the most universally read and applied.

 Herman Wouk, Orthodox Jew and famed author of The Cain Mutiny, affirms, “The Talmud is to this day the circulating heart’s blood of the Jewish religion. Whatever laws, customs, ceremonies we observe—whether we are Orthodox, Conservative, Reform or merely spasmodic sentimentalists—we follow the Talmud. It is our common law.” 1

 One would think that religious literature so centrally important to one of the world’s great religions would be easily located in local libraries. It is certainly easy to find the Bible or Koran.

 Not so the Talmud. While the very largest municipal libraries in a state may possess the Talmud and Zohar, they are almost always absent elsewhere, except in synagogues. In almost every synagogue in the world, the Talmud and Zohar loom above every other piece of literature in authority and appreciation.

 Why are library shelves vacant of the Talmud and Zohar? Quite simply, it’s because Judaism teaches that the law they contain was given to Jews alone and it’s wrong for Gentiles to read that law. The Talmud says, “The goy who pries into the law is worthy of death.” 2

 The Jewish Encyclopedia tells us, “Hence the Talmud prohibited the teaching to a Gentile of the Torah [Talmud and Zohar] “the inheritance of the congregation of Jacob…” R. Johanan says of one so teaching, “Such a person deserves death.”—Sanh. 59a, Hagigah.” 3

 Accordingly, Jewish leaders make it clear to Christian seminaries and scholars that they will not tolerate published research into the Talmud’s real teachings about Christ, Christianity, and Gentiles. Christian academics obey, terrified of being smeared as “anti-Semites.”

 In the early ’80s, as part of research for my book, Israel: Our Duty, Our Dilemma, I visited the Judaic section of the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. to study various versions of the Zohar, or Kabbalah.

 On my first visit, I asked the Jewish librarian where to find the Soncino English translation. He became disturbed and replied, “I don’t think you want to read that. You might misunderstand it.” I couldn’t believe my ears. I’m afraid I showed my anger. He relented.

 Since publication of my book in 1984 and release of my first video documentary on this subject, “The Other Israel,” many people, confronted with the dark side of Judaic ethics, have rejected my message outright. Their reasoning is simple and direct: “What Pike says can’t be true because our Christian leaders and national media have never given us a hint of confirmation for what he says.” A smaller number contend that I quoted out of context or, even worse, forged documents. They think I faked the Xerox copies of the Talmud and Zohar in the appendix of my book, to create the illusion of a Judaic conspiracy.

 Such skepticism has been flying at me via email this week. I will therefore conclude by reproducing a few pages from the Talmud and Zohar, displaying the antipathy of the Talmud and Zohar toward Gentiles.

 Where do I get this stuff? See you at the Library of Congress!

 Endnotes:

1 From a Nov. 19, 1959 installment of This is my God, serialized in The New York Herald-Tribune under “The Talmud: The Heart’s Blood of the Jewish Faith.”

2 Abodah Zarah 26b, Tosephoth. Although this inflammatory dictum was omitted from the Soncino translation of the Talmud, the Jewish Encyclopedia in its article on “Gentiles,” p. 617, confirms its existence in the original.

3 Jewish Encyclopedia, “Gentiles,” p. 623

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