Improvised Explosive Device Explodes on London Underground Train

News Brief — Sept 15, 2017

This is an image made from video showing burning items in underground train at the scene of an explosion in London Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. A reported explosion at a train station sent commuters stampeding in panic, injuring several people at the height of London's morning rush hour, and police said they were investigating it as a terrorist attack. (Sylvain Pennec via AP) Click to enlarge

This is an image made from video showing burning items in underground train at the scene of an explosion in London Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. A reported explosion at a train station sent commuters stampeding in panic, injuring several people at the height of London’s morning rush hour, and police said they were investigating it as a terrorist attack. (Sylvain Pennec via AP) Click to enlarge

An Improvised Explosive Device detonated in a London Underground train carriage earlier today. Fortunately the device doesn’t appear to have detonated properly, so there were no fatalities or serious injuries when it went off.
Had it detonated properly there could have been serious loss of life as it was placed in a packed Underground train during Friday morning rush hour. As it stands 29 people were reported to have sustained relatively minor injuries.
Chris Wildish, who was on the train, said he saw a “device” in the last carriage.
He told BBC 5 live: “Flames were still coming out of it when I saw it and had a lot of wires hanging out of it – I can only assume it was done on purpose.”
Terrorism analyst Magnus Ranstorp with the Swedish Defense University says Londoners have been very fortunate as the device doesn’t appear to have detonated properly.
Had it done so “it could have really become much worse,” he says.
According to Ranstorp the bomber appears to have tried to conceal the device in a bucket and a plastic shopping bag rather than a backpack. He also noted that, from the photos, “it seems that this was hastily put together. Probably not very well mixed together.”
Chris Wildish, who was on the train when the device exploded, said he saw “a massive flash of flames” that reached up to the ceiling of the train and then the air was filled with the smell of chemicals.
Wildish added that many of the passengers were schoolchildren, who were knocked around by people trying to get away from the fire.
As yet no one has claimed responsibility for the attack, although in due course don’t be surprised if some Muslim extremist group linked to ISIS — and through them to British covert operations — claims responsibility.
As we’ve noted, periodically incidents like this are necessary to keep public anxiety levels high. As we learn more about what happened expect to see evidence that the incident was staged-managed or allowed to happen with the knowing collusion of covert operatives in the British intelligence services. Ed.

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