False flag theater: Boston bombing involves clearly staged carnage

Everyone ignores the man who just lost his legs.

Everyone ignores the man who just lost his legs.

“Does a compelling description of a terrorist attack, replete with ‘eyewitness accounts’ of the terrifying scene, and official pronouncements, constitute an actual event?”Florida Atlantic University professor James Tracy.

By Sheila Casey — Truth and Shadows Updated 2017

The mainstream media story of the Boston Marathon bombing is of Chechen terrorists who unleashed weapons of mass destruction, killing four and wounding 264 in an unthinkable scene of “bodies flying into the street”, “so many people without legs” and “blood everywhere.”

For the vast majority of the American population, this is the truth and they feel no need to look further. Yet those who are willing to question the narrative we’ve been sold and take a hard look behind the curtain may be in for a surprise.

Based on the video and photo record, it seems clear that the lead actor in this production—the most grievously wounded, as well as the man who fingered Tamerlan Tsarnaev as the bomber—was faking his injuries, as were most of those allegedly hurt by the first bomb.  We were told his name is Jeff Bauman, but since that can’t be verified and his survival is unbelievable to the point of being miraculous, we’ll simply call him Miracle Man.

First let’s see what can be learned from a Boston Globe video on YouTube that starts six seconds prior to the first explosion.  (For this article, I’m focusing solely on the first explosion and its now famous victim, although serious anomalies–such as the curious case of a missing mailbox– have also been reported at the site of the second explosion.)

The cameraman was standing on the finish line, facing the approaching runners, so had a view of both explosions. For 2 min and 42 seconds, he continues filming, as he walks around the area of the first explosion wildly pointing the camera in all directions.

There is a boom and white smoke rises from the sidewalk. But nothing flies into the street: no debris, no nails or pellets, and certainly no bodies or body parts. None of the flags are knocked down or pierced by shrapnel. Watching this video, it’s easy to understand why some participants believed the explosions to be part of the finish line festivities. All runners except one keep on going: although not hit by anything, an older man falls and rolls on his back, but within 30 seconds he’s on his feet and walking to the finish line.

The second explosion seems similar in intensity to the first, although we don’t see it as clearly.

At 0:53, we get our first good look at the sidewalk behind the fence, in front of Sugar Heaven: there are about seven people there, all standing, and some litter. No blood, no one on the ground. We saw no crowds of people rushing from that area, and usually the finish line of a major race is jammed with spectators. Where did everyone go? Was the area cleared ahead of time?

At 1:17 we get a view of the sidewalk in front of the store next door, Marathon Place, ground zero for the first bomb. We see about five victims on the ground, and perhaps six assisting them. (They may be more, our view is blocked by a fence.)

At 1:53 we see that Carlos Arredondo—who achieved brief fame for rescuing the double amputee, Miracle Man—is still clutching his American flag, even as he tries to get over the fence to help the victims. This is peculiar: who holds onto something unimportant in the face of a mass disaster?

From 2:17 to 2:23 we see an older balding man dressed all in black, gesturing to people off screen to the right to come to him. I say “people,” plural, because he makes the “come to me” gesture continuously for the six seconds we see him, as if bringing in a crowd. He has a lanyard around his neck of the type used by large corporations for employee identification.

Indeed, by 2:35, as the fence is finally pulled away, the sidewalk is much more crowded than it was a minute ago. We also see that Carlos still has not reached Miracle Man.

Although we hear sirens several times, in this video we never see an ambulance or any bodies—living or dead—being carried away. Perhaps all the ambulances went to the second bombing, where people may have really been hurt. At this point the camera aims down at the street and fades out.

The video gives the impression of a bomb much, much smaller than media reports would lead one to believe. The area is swarming with runners, photographers, police and EMTs, but actual victims seem scarce.

Almost seven minutes after the explosion, the Miracle Man is sitting up and not bleeding. (Click photo for hi-res image.)

Almost seven minutes after the explosion, the Miracle Man is sitting up and not bleeding. (Click photo for hi-res image.)

This photo of Miracle Man, who allegedly lost both legs in the first blast, raises several questions.

 

Continues …

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.