Paris airport attacker `shouted of dying for Allah´

Introduction — March 19, 2017

Soldiers patrol at Orly airport, south of Paris, Saturday, March, 18, 2017. Soldiers at Paris' busy Orly Aiport shot and killed a man who wrestled one of their colleagues to the ground and tried to steal her rifle Saturday, officials said. (AP Photo/Kamil Zihnioglu). Click to enlarge

Soldiers patrol at Orly airport, south of Paris, Saturday, March, 18, 2017. Soldiers at Paris’ busy Orly Aiport shot and killed a man who wrestled one of their colleagues to the ground and tried to steal her rifle Saturday, officials said. (AP Photo/Kamil Zihnioglu). Click to enlarge

Like much of Europe France has increasingly become fraught with tension and conflict in recent years. This is largely due to relaxed immigration policies that have seen a massive influx of immigrants from different backgrounds.
In turn this has led to the creation of diverse communities with an intrinsic potential for internal conflict.
In this latest incident a suspected “Islamic extremist” allegedly wrested a soldier’s rifle from her, before being shot dead by her comrades at Orly airport.
On the face of it this seems fairly straightforward. Except that the Press Association reports that the suspect, identified as Ziyed Ben Belgacem, took refuge briefly in “a bar that he frequented regularly”.
Now as Muslims are forbidden to consume alcohol, Ben Belgacem frequenting a bar raises questions. Because crucially this factor is evident in many attacks attributed to Muslim extremists in France in recent years.
Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, the “Muslim fanatic” who allegedly drove a truck into a crowd in Nice, also reportedly “drank alcohol” and “ate pork”. Both strictly prohibited by the Koran.
Abdel Hamid Abaaoud, the alleged mastermind behind terror attacks in Paris in November 2015, also reportedly liked to drink and take drugs. As did France first alleged female suicide bomber, Hasna Aitboulahcen.
All of which raises questions about how devout these terrorists really were? Were they quite the “Muslim fanatics” the media claims? Or were they dupes, led on and bankrolled by covert elements in Western intelligence to assume the role of extremists in a carefully staged phoney terror campaign?
Raising further questions about how far the perpetrator was involved in Muslim extremism were statements by his father.
How many anomalies and inconsistencies will it take before the press really starts asking serious questions? Or are they as much a part of the problem as these alleged “terrorists”? Ed.

Paris airport attacker `shouted of dying for Allah´

Press Association — March 19, 2017

A member of the RAID, (Research, Assistance, Intervention and Deterrence), France's elite police force, patrols at Orly airport, south of Paris, Saturday, March, 18, 2017. Click to enlarge

A member of the RAID, (Research, Assistance, Intervention and Deterrence), France’s elite police force, patrols at Orly airport, south of Paris, Saturday, March, 18, 2017. Click to enlarge

A suspected Islamic extremist attacked a French soldier at a Paris airport – shouting he wanted to kill and die for Allah – and wrested away her assault rifle, a prosecutor said.

Two colleagues on her patrol at Orly Airport shot and killed the man before he could fire the military-grade weapon in the busy airport terminal at 8.30am.

The attack forced terminals at Paris’ second-biggest airport to shut down and evacuate, sent passengers and workers fleeing in panic and trapped hundreds aboard flights that had just landed.

It was the violent climax of a 90-minute spree of criminality across the French capital by the suspect, identified as Ziyed Ben Belgacem.

The attack further rattled France, which remains under a state of emergency after attacks over the past two years that have killed 235 people.

Stopped first by police in suburbs early on Saturday for driving too fast and without lights in a small Renault, the 39-year-old Frenchman opened fire with a revolver loaded with bird shot, injuring an officer in the face, authorities said.

He then fled by car to a bar that he frequented regularly, and where he had already stopped hours earlier, and again opened fire. No one was injured. (Emphasis added.)

Finally, in another car stolen at gunpoint, he parked at Orly. A few minutes later, he hurled himself at three soldiers on patrol in its South Terminal, throwing a bag with a petrol can at the floor and wielding his 9mm revolver, said Paris prosecutor Francois Molins.

“With a pistol in his right hand and a bag over his shoulder, he grabbed (the soldier) with his left arm, made her move backward by three to four meters, positioning her as a shield, and pointed his revolver at her forehead,” he said.

According to soldiers, the attacker yelled: “Put down your weapons! Put your hands on your head! I am here to die for Allah. Whatever happens, there will be deaths.”

In a struggle, the attacker managed to wrest free the captive soldier’s Famas rifle and sling it over his shoulder. Mr Molins said surveillance footage appeared to show that Belgacem was “determined to see the process through to the end”.

In between the moments when he ducked behind his hostage, the two other soldiers fired three bursts, eight rounds in all, that killed the attacker, Mr Molins said.

“Her two comrades thought it was necessary – and they were right – to open fire to protect her and especially to protect all the people who were around,” said French defence minister Jean-Yves Le Drian.

Authorities said at least 3,000 people were evacuated from the airport. Hundreds of passengers were confined for hours aboard 13 flights that were blocked in landing areas, and 15 others were diverted to Charles de Gaulle Airport.

The soldier was “psychologically shocked” but unhurt by the “rapid and violent” assault, said Colonel Benoit Brulon, a spokesman for the military force that patrols public sites in France.

Mr Molins said Belgacem was flagged as having been radicalised during a spell in detention from 2011-2012. His house was among scores searched in November 2015 in the immediate aftermath of suicide bomb-and-gun attacks that killed 130 people in Paris.

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