Very Serious Problems with the WDBJ Shooting Story

by Scott Creighton — Before Its News August 27, 2015

As a young man growing up in Lynchburg, I visited Smith Mountain Lake several times. It’s a beautiful location that brings back a lot of memories for me and I wish it hadn’t been used in such a manner as it was yesterday morning.
While some supposedly alternative websites are busy pushing any race-baiting angle they can come up with regarding this event, I’m going to take a slightly different tack, the one alternative sites USED to take before they all became to frightened to speak out. I’m going to evaluate it as an investigative journalist should, on it’s merits, and make a determination as to whether or not it’s a real tragedy or something else.
The story about WDBJ reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward being shot on live television while doing a promotional spot for Smith Mountain Lake in Moneta, Virginia at 6:43 am is riddled with serious flaws and being covered in such a way as to remind me of all those phony “ISIS™” beheading videos that were anything but videos of someone being beheaded.
We’ll take them one at a time:

The “horrific” and “graphic” images that weren’t

If you remember back when they were still running those fake “ISIS™” videos of the staged beheadings that never seemed to happen on camera, you might recall a campaign emerged from the MSM telling people if they watched the actual videos that had been put out there, “ISIS™” would “win”
There was a major effort put out telling folks not to view the actual videos but instead just to take everyone’s word for it that they were “horrific” and “graphic” and they should hate “ISIS™” and support Obama’s re-engagement of Iraq and bombing of Syria and just leave it at that.
Well, there was a reason for that if you remember. It was because the videos were poorly made at first and not only did they not show people getting their heads cut off, they seemed to show some guy pretending to cut another guy’s neck with a plastic knife.
Of course they didn’t want you too see that because seeing those videos for what they were, or, more accurately, for what they weren’t, would harm the propaganda value of the project. It’s really just that simple.
Seems we have the same thing developing around this story as well.
Here is the actual New York Daily News cover that elicited such a response over it’s “graphic” image.

executed

Do you see anything “graphic” in that image? Seems to me he missed. I mean, after all, if you watch the full video that the man took himself, you can see her run away after he fired a number of shots at her at point blank range. She never seems to react to being hit by a hail of bullets at all. And in the case of this image, she clearly is doing the same thing right before she turns and runs down that deck.
So, you have to ask yourself, why the big deal about not showing the full video of the attack. Why is it being pulled everywhere it’s uploaded? Why are the MSM talking heads acting as if this is the most shocking thing they ever saw? It’s ridiculous. And speaking of ridiculous:
https://twitter.com/danabrams/status/636561965175951365?ref_src=twsrc
Heavy.com posted this dire warning before showing the video of the shooter POV video. Of course, there is no graphic content in the actual video itself.
Graphic images have been shown on the MSM before. Real graphic images.
In this case, the Telegraph slightly blurred out an image of Mike Brown’s body lying dead in the street with a trail of blood coming from him. Is that more horrific than an image of a shooter missing a woman at point blank range?
In this case, CNN published then rebroadcast the iconic image of that burning monk in Vietnam. How many nightmares would that cause Dan Abrams?
And that’s too say nothing of what the Times UK published after 9/11:

That’s a horrific image. That will give you nightmares.
So you have to ask yourself why the big deal being made out of showing the images of this event when they were neither “horrific” nor “graphic”… and the answer is pretty obvious when you look at it realistically.

How did the shooter know where to find these two at 6:43 am?

Something that very few people seem to be asking is, to me, the most obvious: how did Vester Lee Flanagan know where they were going to be for the promo shoot?
Seems like another obvious question, doesn’t it? Smith Mountain Lake is an incredibly isolated area and it’s massive. Finding these three people in the remote location would be like finding a needle in a haystack and that’s assuming that somehow or another Vester was able to figure out they were doing a morning shoot there in the first place.
It’s about an hour from Roanoke and if you know anything about these kinds of promotional shoots, you know it takes about an hour to set one up which means if he had followed one of them from Roanoke, he would have had to have been staking out their cars somewhere around 3 or 4 am. Who does that?

I’m not ready for my close-up Mr. DeMille

This is probably one of the most damning aspects of this investigation of mine so I want you to follow along with me.
What I intend to show here is the fact that Mr. Flanagan was a bit early on his cue and hit his mark before he was supposed to, so he simply stepped back, waited, and then made his entrance again. This might actually be one of the main reasons they don’t want you watching that video.
And remember, he gets there ahead of time so he can set up his props as well. He’s got some kind of body camera on and his gun of course, but he also had to walk to the shoot location, supposedly without being seen by the three people involved in the promo. Ask yourself how that was possible, then go watch his video here.
It’s not “graphic”
Here are eight stills from that video in sequence.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

What we have here is someone entering a scene, hitting his mark early, stepping as if he made an entrance onstage too soon and jumped back in the wings hoping no one would notice. Then, he waits, and resumes his entrance. The others take no notice of him, but that’s ridiculous. Of course they would notice him. How could they not notice him. He’s a large man with a gun pointed at them 4 feet away.
According to his “manifesto”, Flanagan was enraged at this woman. He was a “powder keg” just waiting to go off at her.
In it he wrote: ‘My anger has been building steadily…I’ve been a human powder keg for a while…just waiting to go BOOM!!!!’  Daily Mail
So why is it that he was so concerned about making sure the shooting aspect of the scene was on live TV? I thought he wanted to go “boom!!!”
Wouldn’t it be enough for him to shoot them and have the audience hear it? After all, he was recording it himself. He knew the video would be out there soon enough. So why wait? Why risk his big move? That camera man could have noticed him at any point and dropped his camera and grabbed the gun. After all, he was practically resting it on the guy’s shoulder. So why wait when all that could achieve would be to put his big plan at risk? If he and the cameraman start rolling around for the gun, the supposed target, the reporter, could get away. So why wait?
What was more important? Going “boom!!!”, exacting his revenge on her for something she had nothing to do with… or getting it on live TV? Apparently you have your answer.
He waited because the “shock and awe” aspect of the shooting was all about being live on TV. That’s how it worked. How it was scripted to work. Like the second plane hitting the South Tower 15 minutes after one hit the North Tower. Cameras were all there filming the burning building for live TV broadcasts and here comes another plane to slam into the other tower. Shock and awe.
That’s why he waited and that’s why they paid no attention to him.
When I was in high school back in ’84, I was an actor. We did a production of Anastasia in the round and I played Prince Bounine. The stage was set up with the audience seated on it and they were less than 10 feet from the action. This was before the musical version came out. As the play opened, there was a meeting taking place between myself and several other actors one of whom showed up late. Real late. Like 4 minutes or so. Those of us on stage had to improvise, cover for his absence and get the important information out that his character was supposed to introduce during the “meeting”
When he finally rushed on stage looking panicked, he immediately started in on his first lines, taking us way back to the first lines in the script. Others sat there staring at him not knowing what to do. Since I was “in charge” of the meeting, being Prince Bounine, I told him to “be silent” in my best Yule Brenner impersonation (I wasn’t a particularly good actor as a kid), told him to be silent and sit down. Since he chose to be late to our meeting, he could just sit there until we needed him. Which, to his credit, he did until we rounded back to a point in the script where he could figure out where we were and continue on with the play as normal.

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