What’s behind the astonishing rise of an anti-Islam movement in Germany?

Introduction — Dec 16, 2014

Albert Pike and his alleged prediction of WWIII. Click to enlarge

Albert Pike and his alleged prediction of WWIII. Click to enlarge

The Washington Post omits to mention the obvious: that the Illuminati and their agents in the intelligence services, undercover and in the media, are helping to fuel the rise of anti-Islamic sentiment.
The Washington Post pointedly omits to mention the plans of General Albert Pike. In a letter to Giuseppe Mazzini, dated the 15th of August 1871, Pike had broadly outlined his long-term plan for the seizure of global power. Crucial to this was this was the fomenting of conflict between the nominally Christian West and the Islamic world
Naturally there will be those who try to dismiss this letter as a forgery but it was already being referred to by Canadian Intelligence office William Guy Carr in the 1950s.
That’s long before the rise of modern militant Islam. Nor should we ignore the weight of evidence that militant movements like Islamic State are being sponsored by Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Turkey, all supposedly Western aligned nations. Or that the head of Islamic State Al Baghdadi is reported to be a Mossad trained agent.
None of this warrants a mention in the following. But don’t be surprised if government operatives are helping to promote what is reported in the following article and in their way helping in the fulfillment Albert Pike’s plan. The Western public is being woefully deceived: the principle agents in this deception are the very agencies that claim to be fighting terror, working hand-in-glove with corporate media.

What’s behind the astonishing rise of an anti-Islam movement in Germany?

Rick Noack — Washington Post Dec 16, 2014

Supporters of the Pegida movement in Dresden, Germany. Click to enlarge

Supporters of the Pegida movement in Dresden, Germany. Click to enlarge

Carrying German flags and banners saying “We’re against religious fanaticism,” an increasing number of German protesters, known as the Pegida movement, have taken to the streets in recent weeks to voice their concerns about an influx of Muslim immigrants.

On Monday, 15,000 came to the eastern German city of Dresden to march through the historic city center. Anti-Islam protesters have been chanting “We are the people!” – a slogan that was used in 1989 when eastern Germans rallied to bring down the communist regime. The movement’s members have repeatedly emphasized that they are not extremists, but civil rights groups are accusing them of being “pinstriped Nazis.”

In a country that is still haunted by World War II, the protests have come as a shock to many politicians and left-leaning activists. In an interview on Monday, Germany’s justice minister Heiko Maas called the movement “a shame for Germany” and warned of a new “level of escalation of agitation against immigrants and refugees.” About 6,500 human rights campaigners joined two separate counter-demonstrations on Monday that were organized in opposition to the anti-foreigner movement.

The protests have revealed a deep divide between many citizens and their political elite. Half of Germany sympathizes with the anti-Islam protesters, according to a ZEIT ONLINE-YouGov poll that was released on Monday.

Supporters can be found all over the country, but protests in western Germany have so far failed to attract large numbers of supporters. In eastern Germany, however, the rallies against immigrants have quickly gained steam – despite the fact that only few foreigners currently live there.

 

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