“The Fosters” Brings Family Drama “Up to Date”

henrymakow.com — August 21, 2014

The Fosters "family" consists of an inter-racial lesbian couple with children from different parents and races. Click to enlarge

The Fosters “family” consists of an inter-racial lesbian couple with children from different parents and races. Click to enlarge

Monkey See; Monkey Do. Two percent set the example for 98%
Somehow, I missed the massive popular outcry demanding that multi-racial homosexual “families” become the new societal norm. Thankfully, Hollywood Jews (at ABC-Disney) and homosexuals have anticipated the need to help non-Jews and non-gays shed their racial and family identities. Thanks, Illuminati Jews! Below, the lamestream media promotes the idea that the death of the nuclear family represents progress and “social change.”
[Fosters Creator] “Peter Paige is proving that you can make a traditional family drama with a non-traditional family.”
Illuminati Jews and their Freemason lackeys have never met a society they didn’t want to degrade and despoil.

by Jaime Weinman – “The Fosters Revives an Ailing Television Genre” (Maclean’s)
(Question marks added.)

When you describe The Fosters, it doesn’t sound like the kind of TV drama that would catch on in this edgy age.
The Fosters creator Peter Paige, right, is a gay actor who starred in Showtimes' Queer as Folks for five years. He is pictured here with co-creator Brad Bredewig. Click to enlarge

The Fosters creator Peter Paige, right, is a gay actor who starred in Showtimes’ Queer as Folks for five years. He is pictured here with co-creator Brad Bredewig.

It’s the warmhearted story of a lesbian couple raising children from different parents and races, a companion piece to another ABC Family drama, Switched at Birth, the tale of two families who discover they’ve been raising each other’s children.
“What’s in vogue at this moment (?) is anti-heroes,” says Peter Paige, who co-created The Fosters. His show, which wraps up its second season this month, isn’t in that vogue: the parents are likeable people and so are their kids–even “bad girl” Callie (played by Maia Mitchell).
And yet both The Fosters and Switched at Birth have a following that most good-guy dramas don’t get. The Fosters gets reviewed alongside Game of Thrones on sites like Vulture, and some critics feel it’s edgier than the edgy shows. Manisha Aggarwal-Schifellite, arts editor for Shameless magazine, says The Fosters is willing “to deal with issues of racism, rape, sexual identity and addiction” in a way that cool anti-hero dramas won’t.

IN THE “FAMILY DRAMA” TRADITION? ———–

Continues …

 

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